The Power of Props



We're just home from Sugar On Snow.  I've been trying to see pictures of the event and am  frustrated.  Either the photographers needed to do better angles on the interpreters or the lack of props is a serious problem.At any rate I wish that we could provide back drops, props, and hitching posts for our interpreters. On the other hand, why do they not create and provide for themselves along these lines?  How hard would it be to build a cardboard back drop of the corner of a colonial house or cabin for the spinner of wool to set up her wheel? What an impression it would make to have the whole perspective!  Imagine walking up to the black smith shop walls hung full of the tools of his trade, to have a horse (even a cardboard horse) waiting for a shoe repair. 

This picture of the miller is good.  He has a bit of a setting and the real thing that grinds corn.  We made some of his corn meal into corn bread for supper.  Delicious.

By the way, how well do we interpret the Gospel of Jesus Christ?  When someone walks up to my door, do they see the real interpretation?  Do they go away saying, "I wish I could have spent more time there." ?

 





Comments

  1. Hi Arla,
    Wonderful idea regarding the back drops. We have that at our other re-enactment and we just take it for granted. Also being the new people I think we are maybe hesitant to do much on our own!
    I am sharing your post with Dané and maybe we can do better next year!
    Julie

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  2. I still think it wouldn't be that hard to do a clay oven that could be transported. Craig's oven isn't that big. If you had a good mixture of straw in there to bind the clay together, it should be fairly indestructable.

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  3. I am not being critical of any interpreter at SOS. I am seeing a need and wondering how I can help. So please all you faithful helpers forgive me.

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